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Glossary of Terminology
of the Shamanic & Ceremonial Traditions
of the Inca Medicine Lineage

as Practiced in the United States

 

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APPENDICES
INDEX


ALPHABET:

A
B
C
Ch, Ch' & Chh
D
E
F & G
H
I
J
K
K' & Kh
L
Ll
M
N &
O
P
P', Ph
Q
Q', Qh
R
S
T
T' & Th
U
V
W
Y
Z
 

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    APPENDIX H

    TIMELINE OF THE INCA EMPIRE AND

    ITS CULTURAL PROGENITORS

    Earlier and Other Cultures

    Notwithstanding the glittering and flourishing empire that the Inca created -- with its roads, organization and lack of hunger -- it was not the original creator of culture in its expansive area of South America. It was, rather, the inheritor of more ancient cultures, many of which it conquered and subsumed. Therefore, a study of these progenitor cultures enhances understanding of the Inca culture.

    Some of these earlier cultures were astoundingly sophisticated. The Moche and Nazca flourished along the arid Pacific coastline through fishing and agriculture. The Moche built huge adobe pyramids and collected taxes in the form of labor, a practice continued by the Inca (see, mit’a). Their artisans were envied and copied by the Inca, as were the roads that the Moche built to connect their outposts. The Nazca built aqueducts and irrigation canals to bring precious Andean water to their crops. It is thought these two cultures died due to an El Niño, which caused flooding and reduced fishing hauls.

    The altiplano cultures of the Wari and Tiwanako cultures extended to the Pacific coastline in order to grow crops. Tiwanako arose first and spread south along caravan routes across the desert to distant markets and resources. The Wari culture grew larger than the Tiwanako, extending along almost 1000 miles of Peru. The Inca copied many of their practices. They built administrative centers, roads and military outposts, resettling people into new areas (see, mitimaes) and apparently invented the quipu, which was later refined by the Inca. These two civilizations may have ended due to severe drought. Lake Titicaca is now a fraction of its more ancient size. [The Tiwanako and Aymara cultures are covered more fully in Appendix G (under construction).]

    timeline

    Source: www.cusco-peru.com/cusco/qosqo/3i6_historia.htm [link is no longer active]

    The Inca and the Chimú were rivals and imperialistic. The warlike Chimú grew wealthy from tribute and trade; they also relied on irrigation and boasted expert metalworkers and other artisans. During the Chimú’s greatest period of expansion, the Inca were a minor chiefdom. However, in the 1400’s, even though the Chimú were more sophisticated, the Inca overran them and subsumed their culture, mimicking some of their ways, such as treating the rulers like god-kings who were worshipped even after death (see, mallqui), having descendants inherit estates (rather than successors), and making the small ruling class wealthy.  NGEO3

    The Inca Empire Timeline

    droppedImage.pict

      [Source: NGEO3]

     

    INCA #

    QOYA*

    DATES # (A.D.)

     1

    Manco Capac

    Mama Ocllo

    Chima

    unknown

     2

    Sinchi Roca

    Mama Cuca

    Raura

    unknown

     3

    Lloque Yupanqui

    Mama Cava

    Avayni

    unknown

     4

    Mayta Capac

    Mama Tacucaray

    Usca Mayta

    unknown

     5

    Capac Yupanqui

    Curi-hilpay

    Apu Mayta

    unknown

     6

    Inca Roca

    Mama Micay

    Vicaquirau

    unknown

     7

    Tuti Cusi Hualpa

    (Yahuar Huacac)

    Mama Chicya

    Aucayli

    unknown

     8

    Wiracocha Inca

    Mama Runtucaya

    Socso

    unknown

     9

    Pachacuti Inca Yupanqui.
    Inca history begins. Built Machu Picchu and rebuilt Cusco.

    Mama Anahuarqui

    Inaca

    1438-1471

    10

    Tupa Inca Yupanqui.
    The Empire expanded greatly during his reign.

    Mama Chimpa Ocllo

    Capac

    1471-1493

    11

    Huayna Capac.
    Died in epidemic, as did chosen heir.
    + Succession unclear.

    Cusi Rimay

    Tumipampa

    1493-1527

    12

    Wascar Inca. Executed by his brother, Atahualpa.

    Chucuy Huypa

    Wascar

    1527-1532

    13

    Atahualpa. Captured, held for ransom and executed by Pizarro.

       

    1532-1533

    14

    Manco Capac. Crowned by Pizarro. Later rebelled and relocated the capital to Vilcabamba.

    Ataria Cusi

    Huarcay

     

    1533-1545

     

    Tupa Huallpa. Died shortly after his reign began.

       

    1533

     

    Paullu Inca. Embraced the Spanish and their customs.

       

    1537-1549

     

    Carlos Inca. Married a Spaniard.

       

    1549-1572

    15

    Sayri Tupac. Was named heir as a child.

    Cusi Huacutay

     

    1545-1558

    16

    Titu Cusi [alt. sp. Tuti Cusi]. Dictated Inca history. Only royal to do so.

       

    1558-1571

    17

    Tupac Amaru. Last Inca. Executed by Spanish.

       

    1571-72

        * Source: Sarmiento, History of the Incas                +See, Ninán Cuyúnchic

         # Source: NGEO3

      

    Expansion of the Empire

    droppedImage.pict

    droppedImage.pict  Empire ruled by Pachacuti, 1438-1463

    droppedImage.pict  Expansion under Pachacuti and Tupa Inca, 1463-1471

    droppedImage.pict  Expansion under Tupa Inca, 1471-1493

    droppedImage.pict  Expansion under Huayna Capac, 1493-1527

    [Source: NGEO3]

    Timeline Links

    http://www.timelines.ws/countries/PERU.HTML

    http://www.fortunecity.com/millennium/lilac/3/inka1.htm

     

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Second Edition (c) 2008 Patt O'Neill. All rights reserved. Published Jan. 2008.
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